Origins:

 

The first cross between a domestic cat and the Prionailurus Bengalensis happened in the 60s, in the United States. The goal of this cross was to create a domestic cat with the exceptional beauty and wild look of a small leopard. The first three generations from the breeding with the Asian Leopard Cat are called foundation or filial(F1 to F3). They are known as hybrids. They are not eligible for shows and only the females are fertile. Starting from the fourth generation, the Bengal is considered a domestic breed, also called SBT (stud book traditional) on pedigrees.

Temperament:

 

Bengals are very active, interactive, energetic and playful. They love to jump, chase toys, play fetch and climb! If you are looking for a calm cat, it’s not a breed for you! Over the years, responsible breeders have selected Bengals with the sweetest temperaments for breeding. With proper socialization, they are generally very sweet and loving. Bengals are social cats. They like to play with dogs, other cats, children... If left alone for too long, they can easily get bored. It’s always best if they have a companion. Most Bengals don’t like to be held, they prefer to have their feet on the ground. They will follow you everywhere and love to interact with people. They will often take a nap on you while you watch TV and love to sleep in your bed at night.

 

They can be vocal when they want something (food for example), but it’s generally not excessive or disturbing. Bengals are also very curious. They are amazed of everything new! They often want to enter in the cabinets/closets to see what’s inside… Most Bengals do not fear water. Some even love to share the shower with their owner… Bengals are also very intelligent and they quickly understand what you want to show them. You can easily teach them to do a few agility tricks! They can be harness trained. They will enjoy to take a walk outside.

Hypoallergenic or not?

 

The Bengal pelt is incredibly soft and doesn't have the same texture as a domestic cat’s coat. Their shedding is minimal... Many people who are slightly allergic to domestic cats are able to live with a Bengal and have no symptoms at all. Other people who are more sensitive have tried without success... There are no studies done on the subject. For these reasons, we can not guarantee that your Bengal will be hypoallergenic. If you are allergic to cats, we recommend you to visit a Bengal cattery and see if you have any reaction. 

 

Bengal kitten growing up:

 

Bengal kitten come through a camouflage period called ‘‘fuzzy ugglies’’.  During this stage, their coat may appears faded. The reason is that long hairs hide the rosettes and make the coat appear grey and difficult to photograph. This stage can last as long as 6 months. Some lines appear more fuzzy than others… The color also changes a lot as the kitten grows.

Brown rosetted kitten

3 weeks old

6 weeks old

16 weeks old

6 months old

4 weeks old

9 weeks old

5 months old

8 months old

The amazing frosted kitten

Some Bengal kittens are born with a strange grey color. Their rosettes are almost invisible. This is known as a frosted coat. This pelt will change drastically around 3-4 weeks of age.

A few days old

2 weeks old

4 weeks old

1 week old

3 weeks old

10 weeks old

3 weeks old

Marbled kitten:

2 weeks old

4 weeks old

6 weeks old

10 weeks old

 Maracaja Bengal,  a labor of love, since 2008 

Une histoire de cœur, depuis 2008

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